Course Description

The God Particle is a Beatles Fan
If John Lennon works his way through a crowd full of teenage girls, they will slow him down. Lennon’s speed decreases the more girls are attracted to him. "We think we have found these teenage girls," Martin Archer, a physicist at Imperial College in London, told CNN on July 4th, 2012. In an attempt to explain the particle to the public, he had to create a metaphor that a general audience would understand.
Are you an imaginative naturalist? Always narrating the War of Currents to friends? Obsessed with the human dimension of stats or the half-life of pleasure? Are you interested in exploring where the physical universe collides with the human universe? In this introduction to creative writing course, we will survey works of short fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry that use science as a way to access the personal, fanciful, and flawed experience of living. By writing our own creative pieces, we will work on communicating information, conflict, and awe of scientific endeavors. Students will develop their skills communicating scientific concepts and theories while they interpret and adapt scientific information through weekly readings and writing assignments. In these writing assignments, students will construct creative work that uses literary elements such as image, character, setting, and plot to communicate scientific information. They will understand, appreciate, and critically evaluate a variety of fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry in order to make informed writing decisions. By the end of the semester, students will become comfortable analyzing creative work to understand how it is created, holding craft-based writing discussions, and using craft to inform their own writing.

Texts:

Class website with weekly readings
The Orchid Thief by Susan Orlean
Love in Infant Monkeys by Lydia Millet
Chemical Poems: One on Each Element by Mario Markus
Student Learning Objectives

Student Learning Objectives

• Critically evaluate a variety of fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry in order to make informed writing decisions;
• Organize their thinking to express their viewpoints and scientific information clearly, concisely, creatively, and effectively;
• Construct creative, informative, and publishable written works;
• Construct creative work that uses literary elements such as image, character, setting, and plot to communicate scientific information;
• Gather legitimate information to support their ideas without plagiarizing, misinforming, or distorting.